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Publication information
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Source: Macfadden’s Encyclopedia of Physical Culture
Source type: book
Document type: book chapter
Document title: “Fasting as a Curative Measure” [chapter 1]
Author(s): Macfadden, Bernarr
Edition: Fifth edition
Volume number: 3
Publisher: Physical Culture Publishing Company
Place of publication: New York, New York
Year of publication: 1920
Pagination: 1203-1396 (excerpt below includes only page 1207)

 
Citation
Macfadden, Bernarr. “Fasting as a Curative Measure” [chapter 1]. Macfadden’s Encyclopedia of Physical Culture. 5th ed. Vol. 3. New York: Physical Culture Publishing, 1920: pp. 1203-1396.
 
Transcription
excerpt of chapter
 
Keywords
William McKinley (medical care: criticism); William McKinley (death, cause of).
 
Named persons
William McKinley.
 
Notes
From title page: Completely Revised—1920 Edition; Fifth Printing; Approximately Thirty Thousand Sets, One Hundred Fifty Thousand Volumes.

From title page: Macfadden’s Encyclopedia of Physical Culture: A Work of Reference, Providing Complete Instructions for the Cure of All Diseases through Physcultopathy, with General Information on Natural Methods of Health-Building and a Description of the Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body.

From title page: By Bernarr Macfadden; Assisted by Specialists in the Application of Natural Methods of Healing.
 
Document

 

Fasting as a Curative Measure [excerpt]

     Men who are fleshy should never hesitate for a moment if they are attacked by an acute disease, to take a fast long enough completely to eliminate it. Such persons have enough stored up energy and fuel to run the body for a month or two months without the slightest fear of injury. No matter what their ailment, they cannot possibly be injured by fasting, and there is every assurance that they will be able to rid themselves of the disease. I have referred elsewhere to the case of President McKinley. No sane, unprejudiced man, in the light of the knowledge of fasting which I have here given, can read the bulletins issued by the doctors themselves and not see that the President was simply poisoned by the food that he was urged to eat.

 

 


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