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Publication information
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Source: American Journal of Nursing
Source type: journal
Document type: news column
Document title: “Foreign Department”
Author(s): Dock, Lavinia L.
Date of publication: January 1902
Volume number: 2
Issue number: 4
Pagination: 288-90 (excerpt below includes only pages 289-90)

 
Citation
Dock, Lavinia L. “Foreign Department.” American Journal of Nursing Jan. 1902 v2n4: pp. 288-90.
 
Transcription
excerpt
 
Keywords
American Journal of Nursing (correspondence); McKinley memorial services (Manila, Philippines).
 
Named persons
William McKinley.
 
Notes
This column is credited as being “[i]n the charge of Lavinia L. Dock.” The bracketed note at the outset of the excerpt below is presumably Dock’s. The identity of the nurse who authored the letter excerpted below is not known.
 
Document

 

Foreign Department [excerpt]

     [The following extract from a letter written by a nurse in Manila is of special interest.—ED.]
     “I have completed two years and two months in the Philippine Islands, and it does not seem like one year.
     “I should like to have been with you at Buffalo this September. No doubt the meeting was very interesting. But the Exposition has its sad memory, the assassination of our beloved President McKinley. The news shocked us very much. The funeral services in Manila were grand. September 19, in the morning, music, addresses, and sermons were delivered in the Marble Room of the ‘Ayuntamiento,’ or executive building, and at noon military ceremonies were held on the Lunetta.
     “That was a grand sight. The Lunetta is bounded on one side by the Manila Bay, and the ‘White Squadron’ was lined up, facing it. All during the [289][290] ceremony salutes were fired. An immense throng of people were gathered, representatives of all nations, and the Filipinos came in from all the provinces. All Americans and American sympathizers are wearing mourning for thirty days, and all flags are at half-mast.
     “In connection with the military services solemn prayers were offered by the Archbishop in the Catholic Cathedral (Spanish). The services were very impressive and the music grand, rendered by a Filipino orchestra and boy choir.”

 

 


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