Welcome to MAIWelcome to MAI


"Hello, I'm William McKinley."
partial cover image from "American Boys' Life of William McKinley"                                              
About MAI
Disclaimer
Help MAI


Who I Am
Contact Me



 


Publication information
view printer-friendly version
Source: Chironian
Source type: magazine
Document type: public address
Document title: “Homœopathic Materia Medica as Applied to Surgery”
Author(s): Dewey, Willis A.
Date of publication: 25 May 1902
Volume number: 18
Issue number: 8
Pagination: 120-26 (excerpt below includes only pages 122-23)

 
Citation
Dewey, Willis A. “Homœopathic Materia Medica as Applied to Surgery.” Chironian 25 May 1902 v18n8: pp. 120-26.
 
Transcription
excerpt
 
Keywords
William McKinley (medical care: personal response).
 
Named persons
Carroll Dunham; Edward C. Franklin; William McKinley.
 
Notes
The address (below) appears in a section of the magazine issue titled “Alumni Day” (pp. 114-29), which in the table of contents is identified instead as “Alumni Day Exercises.” On page 120 Dewey’s address is said to have been titled “Materia Medica as Applied to Surgery;” however, the boldfaced title in the magazine preceding the text of the address is “Homœopathic Materia Medica as Applied to Surgery.”

“. . . Willis A. Dewey, M. D., ’80, of Ann Arbor, Mich. . . . ” (p 120).
 
Document

 

Homœopathic Materia Medica as Applied to Surgery [excerpt]

     Another septic remedy is Lachesis, and its use in poisoned wounds has been known and tested from the moment of its introduction into our Materia Medica. It was to this remedy and its successful use in a dissecting wound that won to Homœopathy Dr. Carroll Dunham, a former dean of this institution, and one whose memory will ever flourish in immortal green for his services to our cause. It will be indicated by the sensitiveness, the purplish color, the great burning and an unhealthy appearance about the wound. In boils, carbuncles and abscesses, where there is a tendency of the process to take on a malignant condition, it may be used with confidence. In gangrene following wounds it is eminently curative; traumatic gangrene is especially its field.
     In almost every field of operative surgery there is not only a chance to employ the [122][123] remedy, but we are neglecting the best interests of the patient if we fail to use it. In gun shot wounds the foregoing and other remedies may be used, and may often assist nature in restoring injured tissues. I would recommend the careful perusal of a pamphlet by the late Dr. E. C. Franklin, entitled “Homœopathic Therapeutics in Gun Shot Wounds and the Sequelæ of Operation.” It will make you wish that President McKinley could have had the benefits of the homœopathic remedy.

 

 


top of page