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Publication information
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Source: Star of the Magi
Source type: magazine
Document type: editorial
Document title: “Preventive Precautions Against Crime”
Author(s): Cunningham, G. W.
Date of publication: 1 October 1901
Volume number: 2
Issue number: 12
Pagination: 15

 
Citation
Cunningham, G. W. “Preventive Precautions Against Crime.” Star of the Magi 1 Oct. 1901 v2n12: p. 15.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
McKinley assassination (personal response); education.
 
Named persons
William McKinley; Theodore Roosevelt.
 
Notes
“Prof. G. W. Cunningham” (p. 15).
 
Document

 

Preventive Precautions Against Crime

     The assassination of President McKinley has brought our country face to face with a condition of affairs which require radical and yet wise methods of treatment to guard against a repetition of similar crimes.
     It is generally conceded that our public officials are not lacking in courage or bravery. If the occasion demanded it nobody would question for a moment the fact that President Roosevelt would have the courage to immediately hold a public reception, unguarded, at the exact spot where President McKinley fell mortally wounded. But we as a nation would not be wise to permit such a proceeding if possible to prevent it.
     Stringent laws will probably be enacted with the view of crushing out the spirit of anarchy, yet no effective laws can be created which will prevent a degenerate from being born. So long as such things can be only one law will prove effective, and that is one which will keep our officials where the degenerate will be permanently denied the opportunity to perform what he may imagine is his earthly mission.
     Furthermore, while such a law is being rigidly enforced, it will be well to immediately begin to properly educate the masses, especially as to the great responsibility of those who intend to become parents. The stock breeder selects with the greatest possible care the ancestors of his herd, while, at the same time, human beings are thrown into existence without proper effort being made either by the parents or the government to improve the standard of their perfection. Surely humanity should have an equal chance with our animals. This is a matter for serious consideration in every home as well as in the legislative halls of our government. Thinking will play its important part but it will require action to bring about good results. Proper training is the first prerequisite. Latin, Greek, etc., are all very good in their places yet there are other matters of far greater importance to the present as well as future generations. Will the all powerful people make the necessary demands on their representatives? We await their decision believing that the time is ripe for proper and wise action to be taken.

 

 


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