Publication information

Source:
Bennington Evening Banner
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Chamber of Horrors at Griswold Store”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Bennington, Vermont
Date of publication: 25 February 1922
Volume number: 19
Issue number: 4344
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“Chamber of Horrors at Griswold Store.” Bennington Evening Banner 25 Feb. 1922 v19n4344: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
McKinley assassination (popular culture).
 
Named persons
Warren Burnham; Leon Czolgosz; James A. Garfield; E. T. Griswold; Charles J. Guiteau; Andrew Johnson; Abraham Lincoln; William McKinley.
 
Notes
The identity of Appleby (below) cannot be determined. Possibly it is James F. R. Appleby.
 
Document


Chamber of Horrors at Griswold Store

 

Collection of Grewsome [sic] Relics Incident to Martyrdoms of Three Presidents.

     There is on exhibition in Griswold’s [sh]ow window relics of our three martyred Presidents, L[i]ncoln, Garfield and McKinley, which are interesting and valuable for impressing historical [f]acts on the minds of observers, a[l]though in themselves they are somewhat gruesome.
     A placard gives the date of birth of the President, time he was shot and when he died, and by whom he was murdered.
     There [i]s a campaign watch charm dated 1864 with Lincoln’s portrait on one s[i]de and Johnson’s on the obverse; a piece of tanned skin taken from [th]e forearm of Guiteau, the slayer of President Garfield, by Dr. Appleby of Georgetown, D. C. Dr. Appleby was one of the two surgeons who per[f]ormed the autopsy immediately after the execution and vouches for the genuiness [sic] of this relic. It is now owned by Warren Burnham of this village.
     The th[i]rd re[l]ic is a piece of wood cut from the floor on the exact spot where President McKinley stood when shot by Czolgosz. This was cut by E. T. Griswold. It was the first piece so taken, and which resu[l]ted in the immediate clearing of the room by gua[r]ds and the ultimate railing off o[f] the spot to prevent the dilapitation [sic] of the building by relic hunters.