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Publication information
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Source: Chicago Daily Tribune
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Many M’Kinley Pictures Sold”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Chicago, Illinois
Date of publication: 18 September 1901
Volume number: 60
Issue number: 261
Part/Section: 1
Pagination: 4

 
Citation
“Many M’Kinley Pictures Sold.” Chicago Daily Tribune 18 Sept. 1901 v60n261: part 1, p. 4.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
William McKinley (photographs); William McKinley (popular culture); William McKinley (death: public response: Chicago, IL); William McKinley (mourning: flowers, tokens of grief, etc.).
 
Named persons
William McKinley.
 
Document

 

Many M’Kinley Pictures Sold

 

Lithographers Unable to Supply the Demand for Portraits of the Dead President.

     Thousands of pictures of President McKinley were sold on the streets yesterday. Lithographers who have been seeking to supply the demand for McKinley pictures said that as many as 300,000 portraits of the President had been disposed of since the assassination.
     The lithographers have been working night and day with as many presses as they could bring into service. It is declared that 100,000 more portraits could have been sold during the last two days if they could have been produced. In order to meet the demand “stock” pictures without the black borders and some that have been hastily blotted with an edging of black have been supplied.
     In the residence districts almost every house displays a portrait of the President in the window. Some houses display a picture in every window.
     “The taste of people for portraits of the President runs about alike,” said the manager of one lithographing firm. “They want a good sized picture with black drapery around the edge, although they do not want the picture too somber. The inscription that is most liked bears the last words of the President: ‘God’s will, not ours, be done.’ The great call for pictures has led the makers to put out some that were left over from the campaign, but these are not so salable as the lithographs which have black borders. We have been working our presses all night and are yet unable to fill our orders.”
     Buttons bearing the President’s likeness on them and decorated with crêpe also are being sold by the thousand.

 

 


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