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Publication information
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Source: Chicago Daily Tribune
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Solemn Service in Montreal”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Chicago, Illinois
Date of publication: 19 September 1901
Volume number: 60
Issue number: 262
Part/Section: 1
Pagination: 5

 
Citation
“Solemn Service in Montreal.” Chicago Daily Tribune 19 Sept. 1901 v60n262: part 1, p. 5.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
McKinley memorial services (Montreal, Canada); William McKinley (death: international response).
 
Named persons
William McKinley.
 
Document

 

Solemn Service in Montreal

 

English Cathedrals Hold Memorial Ceremony, in Which Many High Clergy Take Part.

     Montreal, Que., Sept. 18.—[Special.]—An impressive memorial service for President McKinley was held in the English Cathedral. It was attended by all the Bishops of the Church of England in Canada and by upwards of 200 clergy, the majority of whom took part in the processional and recessional around the church.
     In addition to the Bishops of the Canadian Church his Lordship, the Bishop of Tinnevelly, India, was present and occupied one of the stalls in the choir. The service consisted of the burial office of the Church of England, with appropriate hymns, psalms, and prayers. The opening sentences were read by the Lord Bishop of Ontario, the lesson by the Lord Bishop of Nova Scotia, the prayers before and after the committal, which was omitted, by his Grace, Archbishop of Montreal, and the final prayers and benediction by the Lord Bishop of Huron.
     The service was largely attended, almost every portion of the cathedral being filled. Among the congregation were scores of American visitors in the city. The church was draped in black for the occasion, the sombreness of which was relieved insofar as the reading desks, lectern, pulpit, and altar were concerned, by the British and American flags, which were intertwined with mourning ribbons of black silk.

 

 


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