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Publication information
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Source: Irish-American
Source type: newspaper
Document type: editorial
Document title: “President Roosevelt”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: New York, New York
Date of publication: 21 September 1901
Volume number: 53
Issue number: 38
Pagination: 4

 
Citation
“President Roosevelt.” Irish-American 21 Sept. 1901 v53n38: p. 4.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Theodore Roosevelt (fitness for office).
 
Named persons
Theodore Roosevelt.
 
Document

 

President Roosevelt

     Theodore Roosevelt, twenty-sixth President of the United States, had an Irish grandmother, and he is fond of attributing to that sturdy strain those aggressive qualities which have played no small part in his remarkable career. Although the youngest man to reach the great office he now holds, few, if any, of his predecessors have had so wide and thorough a training for the position. He was in his earliest manhood an active and valuable member of the State Legislature. As President of the National Board of Civil Service Commissioners he labored unremittingly for the betterment of the civil service. In New York City he mastered, as President of the Board of Police Commissioners, the subject of the police and municipal administration. He became thoroughly acquainted with naval affairs when Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and as Colonel of a regiment in the war with Spain, obtained thorough experience and valuable knowledge of the army. As Governor of the great State of New York, he proved to be a strong, steady executive, and his brief experience as Vice-President and President of the Senate, serves but to cap his other varied experiences. He has been a man of affairs and also a student of affairs, and his contributions to the history of his country are useful and instructive. He thus comes to his high office as a man who has knowledge and experience. He has written history and has helped to make history, and his honesty, patriotism, admirable abilities, earnestness and singleness of purpose seem to justify the high hopes held by his fellow countrymen, of all shades of opinion, that President Roosevelt’s Administration will enroll his name with the strong, serious statesmen who deserve the gratitude of the nation.

 

 


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