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Publication information
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Source: Milford Cabinet
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Heard the Shots Fired at Buffalo”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Milford, New Hampshire
Date of publication: 19 September 1901
Volume number: 100
Issue number: 12
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“Heard the Shots Fired at Buffalo.” Milford Cabinet 19 Sept. 1901 v100n12: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Henry J. Nichols; McKinley assassination (eyewitnesses); McKinley assassination (eyewitness accounts: Henry J. Nichols).
 
Named persons
William McKinley; Henry J. Nichols.
 
Document

 

Heard the Shots Fired at Buffalo

     Henry Nichols, assistant cashier of the Souhegan National bank of Milford has the destinction [sic] of having heard the two shots fired that ended the life of the chief executive of this nation. He had been an interested observer of the great exposition, which was his object in visiting Buffalo, and of which he expresses himself in words of praise in regard to the extent and general interest. It was on the day that the president made his memorab e spe ch [sic] during which Mr. Nichols had a fine opportunity of seeing McKinley, but it was at the reception that he stood in line waiting to get an opportunity of taking the president by the hand, and when not many feet away heard the fatal shots that have plunged this nation into intense mourning. He said it was but a moment before it was whispered about that President McKinley had been shot and the anguish and emotion that followed was indescribable. Later it was his opportunity of seeing the stricken president placed in an ambulance and conveyed to the Milburn house. It was a moment of great excitement and only needed a leader to have precipitated a demonstration that would have resulted in tearing the assassin in pieces. Still it was his observation that the character of the crowd were [sic] of an element that could easily be restrained by p lice [sic] and soldiers that were called quickly to the spot, which prevented o[t]her occurrences that might have followed under other circumstances.

 

 


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