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Publication information
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Source: Buffalo Enquirer
Source type: newspaper
Document type: editorial
Document title: “The Wretch Czolgosz Glories in His Notoriety”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Buffalo, New York
Date of publication: 18 September 1901
Volume number: 58
Issue number: 43
Pagination: 2

 
Citation
“The Wretch Czolgosz Glories in His Notoriety.” Buffalo Enquirer 18 Sept. 1901 v58n43: p. 2.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Leon Czolgosz (arraignment: public response); Leon Czolgosz (arraignment); Leon Czolgosz; Leon Czolgosz (arraignment: news coverage).
 
Named persons
Edward K. Emery.
 
Document

 

The Wretch Czolgosz Glories in His Notoriety

     There was a wide difference of opinion as expressed by the spectators who saw the assassin of the President arraigned before Judge Emery in the County Court yesterday afternoon. He was as silent as ever, but instead of gazing stolidly at the floor as he did on his first appearance in court the day before, yesterday he took a lively interest in the work of the reporters who were busily engaged at a table in front of him taking down each word uttered by the District Attorney, Judge and counsel. At times the dull look of his countenance was replaced by a flash of intelligence, as he watched the busy writers, and his face told plainly that he was exulting in the fact that his deed and his actions in court were being chronicled and sent broadcast over the world; that he was the hero of the hour with the Anarchists. Some expressed the opinion that the miserable being was dazed as he realized the enormity of his crime; others, that he was waiting and wondering from which direction the expected bullet or knife from the rear would reach him; others, that he was shamming insanity. However, the evidence of his guards, who state that before he reached the court room, he was defiant and talked freely is proof conclusive that his demeanor in court is a species of stoicism characteristic of his type.

 

 


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