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Publication information
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Source: Chicago Sunday Tribune
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “How Brother Heard the News”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Chicago, Illinois
Date of publication: 8 September 1901
Volume number: 60
Issue number: 251
Part/Section: 1
Pagination: 4

 
Citation
“How Brother Heard the News.” Chicago Sunday Tribune 8 Sept. 1901 v60n251: part 1, p. 4.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
C. F. Meek (public statements); Abner McKinley (informed about assassination); McKinley assassination (personal response).
 
Named persons
Abner McKinley; Anna Endsley McKinley (sister-in-law); C. F. Meek.
 
Document

 

How Brother Heard the News

 

Dramatic Story of Storm Which Broke in Colorado When Abner McKinley Received Telegram.

     Denver, Colo., Sept. 7.—A dramatic story of the circumstances attending the reception by Abner McKinley and family in Platte Cańon yesterday of the news of the attempted assassination of the President was told today by C. F. Meek, a railway official.
     “As the telegram was handed to me,” said Mr. Meek, “there was a terrible flash of lightning, followed directly by a crash that shook the granite mountains. I glanced at the contents of the telegram, staggered into the car, and called Abner McKinley to one side.
     “Between the crashes of heaven’s artillery I read the message. Mr. McKinley put his hand to his head and staggered. With each step almost there was a terrific crash from above. We called the rest of the party together and plainly told them the situation.
     “At first we were speechless—tearless.
     “Then came the torrent. From above broke forth the most astounding masses of water, great sheets of it. The heavens wept with us.
     “Then there was a rainbow the like of which few men have ever seen. It was an arch of crimson and gold that rivaled a noonday sun. Mrs. McKinley looked at it a moment in mute astonishment. ‘It is the sign from God that he will let our brother live,’ was her remark as she fell upon her knees.
     “With tears streaming down our faces we did likewise, and the prayer that went up certainly must have reached the Father above, for the rainbow grew wider and brighter as we prayed and suddenly flared up as if assenting to our supplications.”

 

 


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