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Publication information
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Source: New York World
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Expert Nurse Who Waits on President”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: New York, New York
Date of publication: 13 September 1901
Volume number: 42
Issue number: 4600
Pagination: 4

 
Citation
“Expert Nurse Who Waits on President.” New York World 13 Sept. 1901 v42n4600: p. 4.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
William McKinley (medical care); Grace McKenzie; McKinley nurses.
 
Named persons
Cornelia Gage; Lyman J. Gage; Grace McKenzie [misspelled below]; William McKinley; Presley M. Rixey.
 
Notes
The article is accompanied on the same page with a photograph of Grace McKenzie.
 
Document

 

Expert Nurse Who Waits on President

 

Miss Grace Mackenzie Summoned from Baltimore by Dr. Rixey.

     BUFFALO, N. Y., Sept. 11.—To the skilful [sic] nursing of Miss Grace Mackenzie, a graduate trained nurse, President McKinley will owe much of his rapid recovery from his wound. In addition to Miss Mackenzie there are two other nurses and three orderlies, but Miss Mackenzie is in charge.
     She was summoned to Buffalo personally by Dr. Rixey, the President’s physician, who has the greatest confidence in her ability. Miss Mackenzie was nursing in Baltimore when she received the summons to take charge of the President’s case. Dr. Rixey had attended patients nursed by Miss Mackenzie and he recognized her admirable qualities as a nurse.
     Miss Mackenzie is a Canadian, but her professional training was at the Training School, Philadelphia. She was graduated in 1894 and went to the Kelly Sanitarium, in Baltimore. After spending three years there she devoted herself to nursing the sick in Washington, Baltimore and Philadelphia. She is in great demand by surgeons having difficult cases, and was the nurse for the wife of Lyman J. Gage, Secretary of the Treasury, who died last May. It was while she was [in?] attendance on Mrs. Gage that Dr. Rixey first became impressed with her ability.

 

 


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