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Publication information
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Source: Salt Lake Herald
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “George A. Smith and Otto Stalmann Near the President When He Was Shot”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Salt Lake City, Utah
Date of publication: 17 September 1901
Volume number: 29
Issue number: 115
Pagination: 3

 
Citation
“George A. Smith and Otto Stalmann Near the President When He Was Shot.” Salt Lake Herald 17 Sept. 1901 v29n115: p. 3.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
George Albert Smith; McKinley assassination (persons present on exposition grounds); McKinley assassination (public response: Buffalo, NY); Otto Stalmann; McKinley assassination (eyewitnesses).
 
Named persons
George Albert Smith; Otto Stalmann.
 
Document

 

George A. Smith and Otto Stalmann Near the President When He Was Shot

     George A. Smith, the receiver of the land office, arrived in Salt Lake yesterdoay [sic], after a trip through the east, during which he visited a number of the large cities on the Atlantic and many other points of historical interest. He was at Buffalo when the presid[e]nt was shot, and although he was sitting on the steps of the Temple of Music when the tragedy was enacted it was fully twenty minutes before he realized what had happened. The people were stunned, he said, by the enormity of the crime.
     Otto Stalmann, general manager for the Glasgow & Western Exploration company, who returned last night from a trip abroad extending over a period of nearly a year, was also within fifty feet of the president when the shots that resulted in his death were fired. He stated that the crowd could hardly realize what had happened. He saw the murderer removed to the side room off the Temple of Music and later witnessed his removal from the grounds to prison heavily guarded by soldiers. Mr. Stalmann said the greatest excitement came at night when it looked as though the populace would storm the jail and take the prisoner out and hang him. The peoplse [sic] were frenzied with rage and how a lynching was averted he really could not tell.
     After leaving Buffalo Mr. Stalmann spent a few days in Chicago and then came on home. He left his family in Germany.

 

 


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