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Publication information
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Source: Personal Memoirs of the Home Life of the Late Theodore Roosevelt
Source type: book
Document type: book chapter
Document title: “When Vice-President of the United States” [chapter 3]
Author(s): Cheney, Albert Loren
Edition: Second edition
Publisher: Cheney Publishing Company
Place of publication: Washington, DC
Year of publication:
1919
Pagination: 35-52 (excerpt below includes only pages 36-37)

 
Citation
Cheney, Albert Loren. “When Vice-President of the United States” [chapter 3]. Personal Memoirs of the Home Life of the Late Theodore Roosevelt. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Cheney Publishing, 1919: pp. 35-52.
 
Transcription
excerpt of chapter
 
Keywords
McKinley assassination (news coverage); Theodore Roosevelt (informed about assassination); Albert Loren Cheney; Roosevelt residence.
 
Named persons
Albert Loren Cheney; William Loeb; William McKinley; Henry Pinckney [misspelled below]; Theodore Roosevelt.
 
Notes
From title page: Personal Memoirs of the Home Life of the Late Theodore Roosevelt: As Soldier, Governor, Vice President, and President, in Relation to Oyster Bay.

From title page: By Albert Loren Cheney, Formerly Editor of the Oyster Bay Pilot.

From title page: With Illustrations.

Alternate book title: Personal Memoirs of the Home Life of the Late Theodore Roosevelt as Soldier, Governor, Vice President, and President, in Relation to Oyster Bay.
 
Document

 

When Vice-President of the United States [excerpt]

MR. ROOSEVELT was deeply impressed when informed how the news of the attempted assassination of President McKinley first reached Oyster Bay.
     The New York World had a direct wire to Buffalo, and received the news almost immediately after Mr. McKinley was shot. The World editor’s first thought was:
     “Where’s Roosevelt?”
     Then: “Get Cheney at Oyster Bay.”
     The connection was made immediately, and the editor’s announcement was, of course a shock to me. Dropping the telephone receiver, I hastened to dispatch a message for Pickney, the White House steward, and another to Secretary Loeb.
     It was found that everybody connected with Sagamore Hill had left Oyster Bay that very afternoon, and no information could be obtained as to the whereabouts of Vice-President Roosevelt, who was absent on a hunting trip at the time. A bulletin of the tragedy was posted in front of the Pilot office in Oyster Bay before bulletins or extra pa- [36][37] pers were issued in New York City. This fact was the subject of an article printed later by the Associated Press.

 

 


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