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Publication information
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Source: Buffalo Medical Journal
Source type: journal
Document type: editorial
Document title: none
Author(s): anonymous
Date of publication: September 1901
Volume number: 41
Issue number: 2
Series: new series
Pagination: 137

 
Citation
[untitled]. Buffalo Medical Journal Sept. 1901 v41n2 (new series): p. 137.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Pan-American Exposition (medical matters).
 
Named persons
Nelson W. Wilson.
 
Document

 

[untitled]

DR. NELSON W. WILSON, sanitary officer of the exposition is kept busy in looking after the health of the Rainbow City. When one considers that the exposition is really a vast camp being occupied for six months, inhabited by thousands of people who permanently reside within its lines, and which is visited by millions of others who are coming and going constantly and who must be fed and cared for in various ways, some conception may be formed of the duties of the sanitary officer. He must be on the alert to detect any infraction of the rules and he must enforce his orders with an imperial hand. That no serious sickness has disturbed the inhabitants of the Midway, which numbers amongst its population people of all climes and of every race and nation on the face of the globe, many of whom have been indifferently trained and some being entirely ignorant of sanitary laws, it seems almost marvelous that no epidemic or infectious disease has appeared.
     Sometimes it has been necessary to enforce orders with apparent severity, but every concessionaire and exhibitor will recognise that he has no better friend than a sanitary officer who performs his duties in a fearless manner.
     To show how alert one must be, several days ago the sanitary officer seized several phosphate bottles with metal tops, and destroyed them. They were being used by two independent drink-stand concessionaires. Only glass and porcelain tops are allowed on phosphate bottles, because the gases of the phosphate corrode the metal and breed disease. Dr. Wilson inspects daily all drink-dispensing and food-selling booths, and it is asserted that there is not one thing to eat or drink sold on the grounds that is in any way unclean, if rigid inspection can prevent it.

 

 


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