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Publication information
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Source: Iowa Normal Monthly
Source type: journal
Document type: editorial column
Document title: “Notes and Comments”
Author(s): anonymous
Date of publication: October 1901
Volume number: 25
Issue number: 3
Pagination: 99-103 (excerpt below includes only pages 99 and 103)

 
Citation
“Notes and Comments.” Iowa Normal Monthly Oct. 1901 v25n3: pp. 99-103.
 
Transcription
excerpt
 
Keywords
William McKinley (death: government response); McKinley memorialization (Iowa); anarchism (government response); the press (censorship).
 
Named persons
Richard C. Barrett; William McKinley.
 
Notes
The excerpt below comprises two nonconsecutive portions of the editorial column (p. 99 and p. 103). Omission of text within the excerpt is indicated with a bracketed indicator (e.g., [omit]).
 
Document

 

Notes and Comments [excerpt]

     Superintendent R. C. Barrett of the state of Iowa department of public instruction, issued the following or[d]er to the teachers of Iowa: “In memory of President McKinley, whose every effort was exerted to help all mankind to higher and holier ways of living, and who sought by his example to teach what true living is, it is recommended that all those in charge of public schools in this [s]tate display at half mast our national flag on all public school buildings until after the interment of the distinguished dead; and that in harmony with the proclamations of the president of the United States and the governor of Iowa, September 19 be observed in all schools by such exercises as will direct the minds and hearts of the youth of the state to the Christian virtues, patriotic services and high character of our martyred president.”

[omit]

     The postoffice [sic] department is planning to keep anarchist publications including newspapers, out of the mails. If a rigid rule of this kind is established, some well established, and well known and largely circulated newspaper will be stopped at the doors of the Chicago and New York postoffices [sic].

 

 


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