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Publication information
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Source: Public Opinion
Source type: magazine
Document type: news column
Document title: “News of the Week”
Author(s): anonymous
Date of publication: 12 September 1901
Volume number: 31
Issue number: 11
Pagination: 349

 
Citation
“News of the Week.” Public Opinion 12 Sept. 1901 v31n11: p. 349.
 
Transcription
excerpt
 
Keywords
William McKinley (at Pan-American Exposition); McKinley assassination; William McKinley (medical condition); McKinley assassination (international response); Leon Czolgosz.
 
Named persons
Leon Czolgosz; Ida McKinley; William McKinley.
 
Notes
Ellipses (“. . .”) appear below as given in the original document. Omission of text within the excerpt is indicated with a bracketed indicator (e.g., [omit]).
 
Document

 

News of the Week [excerpt]

 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

     DOMESTIC.—President McKinley arrived in Buffalo to attend the exposition . . . . [omit]


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

     DOMESTIC.—The president and Mrs. McKinley were enthusiastically received at the Pan-American exposition; the president in his speech dwelt especially on expansion of trade and commerce . . . . [omit]


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

     DOMESTIC.—President McKinley was shot twice and seriously wounded, in the temple of music, at the Pan-American exposition by a Pole named Leon Czolgosz; one bullet entered the president’s abdomen and the other his right breast; the bullet in the breast was removed, but the other was not found.
     FOREIGN.—Sorrow was expressed in Great Britain and in other countries for the attempted assassination of President McKinley at Buffalo . . . . [omit]


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

     DOMESTIC.—President McKinley’s condition was reported extremely grave; blood poisoning is the chief danger feared; Czolgosz, the would-be assassin, made a confession to the Buffalo police, who believe there was a plot to assassinate the president.
     FOREIGN.—Messages of condolence regarding the shooting of President McKinley were sent from almost all foreign courts and from South American republics, and many well known persons abroad also sent dispatches of sympathy . . . . [omit]


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

     DOMESTIC.—There was a marked change for the better in President McKinley’s condition, and, while he is not out of danger, strong hope of his recovery was expressed; the physicians’ bulletins were all favorable; the president had four hours of natural sleep, and took nourishment for the first time since he was shot . . . . [omit]
     FOREIGN.—Sympathy for the president and interest in his condition continued unabated in Europe; prayers for his recovery were offered in many churches . . . . [omit]

 

 


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