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Publication information
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Source: Laramie Boomerang
Source type: newspaper
Document type: editorial
Document title: “Idlers All”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Laramie, Wyoming
Date of publication: 13 September 1901
Volume number: 21
Issue number: 152
Pagination: [6]

 
Citation
“Idlers All.” Laramie Boomerang 13 Sept. 1901 v21n152: p. [6].
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Leon Czolgosz (as anarchist); Czolgosz family; Leon Czolgosz.
 
Named persons
Leon Czolgosz; William McKinley.
 
Document

 

Idlers All

     An indisputable fact in connection with the life of the man who made the assault upon President McKinley is that for three years past, during which time he has developed his anar[c]histic tendencies, he has done very little work. The same thing is true as a rule, of most of the men and women who appear to be conspicuous in th[e] anarchistic propaganda.
     It is related o[f] the family of Czolgosz that all of its members, except himself, are and have been industrious and peace[a]ble. His parents and his brothers and sisters are employed regularly and most of them have given public expression to the abhorence [sic] with whi[c]h they view his crime. One of his brothers is a soldier in the United States army in the Phi[l]ippines.
     Most of the people in every walk of life who are greatly moved by [t]he h[a]rdships of the poor and who are most violent in their denunciation of the well-to-do are not only idlers, but they are apparently incapable of doing anything to relieve the distress which impresses them so deeply. They are parasi[t]es. Some toiler supports them. They wi[l]l not work and their sympathy for those who do work do[e]s not go beyond mere lip service.
     It is true of poor and rich alike that useful occupation is the best incentive to wholesome thought and a useful life. The idler soon be[c]omes a mischief-maker, involving not only himself but others in trouble o[f] many kinds.
     Hard work and plenty of it would have kept Czolgosz’ [sic] mind and body in a healthful condition, wherein he would have been unmoved by the follies of agitators and kept free from the rancor against [t]he rich and power[f]ul which led him into pessimism and crime.

 

 


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