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Publication information
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Source: Summary
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “McKinley Monument Day”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Elmira, New York
Date of publication: 19 September 1903
Volume number: 31
Issue number: 38
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“McKinley Monument Day.” Summary 19 Sept. 1903 v31n38: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
McKinley memorial (Toledo, OH: dedication); McKinley assassination (anniversaries of).
 
Named persons
Dorothy Bonner; Joseph C. Bonner [middle initial wrong below]; Charles W. Fairbanks; Marcus Hanna; William McKinley.
 
Document

 

McKinley Monument Day

     TOLEDO, Sept. 15.—Fully 100,000 people saw the unveiling of the bronze statue of William McKinley in this city yesterday. The civic and military parade that preceded the unveiling is said by all to have been the most imposing in Ohio since the close of the Rebellion. Senator Hanna, although in poor health, presided as officer of the day, and paid a glowing tribute to the late President in introducing Senator Fairbanks of Indiana, who made the principal address of the occasion.
     Dorothy Bonner, daughter of Col. J. S. Bonner, president of the McKinley Memorial Association, pulled the cord to drop the draping, but unfortunately it broke and two Regular soldiers standing by sprang to the base of the monument and quickly swept the covering to the base of the shaft, while cheers rang from thousands.
     The monument was built by 6,500 Toledo contributions from adults and the mites of over 20,000 school children. It is of bronze, heroic size mounted on a shaft of marble on a broad base of white granite surrounded with flowers.
     There were no public exercises in Canton to-day. Flags were lowered on the public buildings and school buildings and reference to the life of McKinley and his death was made in the schools. Carnations, McKinley’s favorite flower, were worn by many in recognition of the day.

 

 


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