Welcome to MAIWelcome to MAI


"Hello, I'm William McKinley."
partial cover image from "American Boys' Life of William McKinley"                                              
About MAI
Disclaimer
Help MAI


Who I Am
Contact Me



 


Publication information
view printer-friendly version
Source: Atlanta Constitution
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Arch Hall, Cleveland, O., Where Czolgosz Listened to Teachings That Inflamed Him”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Atlanta, Georgia
Date of publication: 12 September 1901
Volume number: 34
Issue number: none
Pagination: 3

 
Citation
“Arch Hall, Cleveland, O., Where Czolgosz Listened to Teachings That Inflamed Him.” Atlanta Constitution 12 Sept. 1901 v34: p. 3.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Arch Hall (Cleveland, OH); Leon Czolgosz (as anarchist); Leon Czolgosz (activities, whereabouts, etc.: Cleveland, OH).
 
Named persons
George E. Corner; Leon Czolgosz.
 
Notes
This article is accompanied on the same page by a photograph of Arch Hall.
 
Document

 

Arch Hall, Cleveland, O., Where Czolgosz Listened to Teachings That Inflamed Him

 

(Special Correspondence.)

     CLEVELAND, Ohio, September 9.—Leon Czolgosz, who now occupies a felon’s cell in Buffalo, because of his attempt on the life of the president, learned the rudiments of anarchy in Arch hall, a sectional view of which is shown in the accompanying illustration.
     Before the man who tried to kill the president became an anarchist he was a socialist. The transition between the two theories was very brief for Czolgosz. The philosophy which he mastered at Arch hall six years ago was insufficient for him. He found it entirely inadequate and finally seceded from the socialist organization and together with a few of the bolder lights formed a branch of this society in Newburg. The branch was made up very largely of Poles, and out in the seclusion of Newburg there were no restraints put upon them. Here Czolgosz became an anarchist. Here he advocated the destruction of all governments and of all rulers. His associates then were not as bold as he was but they were anarchists.
     Today the men who are still attending the Arch hall meetings are the loudest in their denunciation of the crime of Czolgosz. They declare that the precepts of socialism could never lead to such a crime. They denounce their former companion and associate as a red-handed murderer.
     It is quite possible that the police may from now on undertake to exterminate these anarchistic organizations in this city. Cleveland is a lawless place at times. Free speech has been given a wide range and has often approached treason. It will be stopped from now on, according to Chief of Police Corner.

 

 


top of page