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Publication information
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Source: Buffalo Evening News
Source type: newspaper
Document type: letter to the editor
Document title: “Make Assassin’s Trial a Lesson to Anarchists”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Buffalo, New York
Date of publication: 20 September 1901
Volume number: 42
Issue number: 137
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“Make Assassin’s Trial a Lesson to Anarchists.” Buffalo Evening News 20 Sept. 1901 v42n137: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Leon Czolgosz (trial: predictions, expectations, etc.); Leon Czolgosz (trial: personal response); anarchism (dealing with).
 
Named persons
Edward H. Butler; Leon Czolgosz.
 
Document

 

Make Assassin’s Trial a Lesson to Anarchists

 

“It Should Be Short, Sharp and Terrible,” Writes “Justice” to The News.

     The following letter, which is to the point, was received at the NEWS office this morning:
Mr. E. H. Butler, Editor the NEWS:
     Dear Sir—The eyes of the nation will be on Buffalo again next week. If the trial of Czolgosz goes on as most trials do, it will be a week, perhaps two, before he is sentenced. Meanwhile he and his kind will be well-advertised and the seeds of like outrages broadly sown.
     Now, why can’t our courts do as the Jersey courts do, get the jury, swear the witnesses and sentence the prisoner in one day? There is no doubt of guilt here. Only the forms of law stand between the assassin and his deserts. I, for one, would like to see this trial last but one session of the court, be that session two or twenty hours long. Judge, jury and lawyers can well fast and go sleepless until this stain on Buffalo’s fair name shall be wiped out. It would be a salutary lesson to the anarchistic gentry. It would prove to the world that New York and Buffalo intend hereafter to give them short shrift.
     What say you, dear Mr. Editor, shall the coming trial be short, sharp and terrible in its lesson, or shall the nation turn away in disgust from the pettifogging possibilities of New York’s criminal law?

JUSTICE.     

 

 


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