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Publication information
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Source: Buffalo Review
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Czolgosz Is Already in the Death Cell at Auburn Prison Awaiting the Day of His Doom”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Buffalo, New York
Date of publication: 27 September 1901
Volume number: 19
Issue number: 96
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“Czolgosz Is Already in the Death Cell at Auburn Prison Awaiting the Day of His Doom.” Buffalo Review 27 Sept. 1901 v19n96: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Leon Czolgosz (removal to Auburn State Prison); Leon Czolgosz (public statements).
 
Named persons
Samuel Caldwell; Leon Czolgosz.
 
Document

 

Czolgosz Is Already in the Death Cell at Auburn Prison Awaiting the Day of His Doom

 

Sheriff Samuel Caldwell Took the Condemned Man away on the 9:30
New York Central Train Last Evening and the Destination
Was Reached at 2 O’clock This Morning.

     Czolgosz was taken to Auburn on the [?] o’clock train over the New York Central last night. Those who gathered at the railway station to see the prisoner were disappointed. In spite of the sheriff’s precautions, it became known that this train was to be used.
     A private day coach was sent down to the New York Central tracks north of the Terrace station and within 200 feet of the jail. Czolgosz, surrounded by fifteen deputy sheriffs, was hustled across lots to the car. The curtains of the car windows were drawn, the doors were guarded and the prisoner was shackled to his seat and to one of the deputies, who sat beside him. The car was attached to the regular 9:30 train.
     Sheriff Caldwell was personally in charge of the prisoner.
     The train arrived at Auburn at 2:12 o’clock this morning, and the prisoner was conducted to the death cell direct.

CZOLGOSZ SAYS HE IS SORRY.

     Czolgosz talked freely while the journey from Buffalo was being made. He said he wanted the public to understand that he was sorry for his crime. He said he had been excited by Anarchistic ideas. But there was no conspiracy to kill the President.
     “I had no personal grievance against the President,” said the assassin. “My trial has been much fairer than I expected.”

 

 


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