Publication information

Source:
Journal-Advance
Source type: newspaper
Document type: editorial
Document title: none
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Gentry, Arkansas
Date of publication: 13 September 1901
Volume number: 7
Issue number: 39
Pagination: [2]

 
Citation
[untitled]. Journal-Advance 13 Sept. 1901 v7n39: p. [2].
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
McKinley assassination (personal response); anarchism (personal response); lawlessness (mob rule); T. De Witt Talmage (public statements); McKinley assassination (religious response).
 
Named persons
John Wilkes Booth; Leon Czolgosz; Charles J. Guiteau; T. De Witt Talmage [middle name wrong below].
 
Document


[untitled]

     IF there ever was an instance where lynch law could be consistently applied, it is in the case of Czolgosz, for his treacherous attempt to assassination the President. The anarchist respects no law and is opposed to all laws, and is therefore entitled to no protection. In a sermon delivered at Ocean Grove to a congregation of ten thousand, T. DeWitt Talmage, the great preacher, said: I wish that the Buffalo policeman who seized the pistol of the scoundrel who shot our beloved President had taken the butt end of the weapon and dashed the mans brains out on the spot! His words were cheered to the echo by the congregation. In all the large cities of the North are nests of anarchy, where plots against the government and schemes of assassination are hatched. They hold their meeings [sic] in the back rooms of saloons and guzzle beer, and pretend they are working in the interest of liberty. A red flag and a bottle of whiskey will arouse their emotions, but all the sound reasoning of past generations has no good effect upon these murderous wretches. The anarchistic organization is made up of foreign rifraff [sic], with unpronounceable names, red hands and flannel mouths. They should be banished from the country. Of the three men who have shot presidents in this country, not one can be called an American, and this fact is some consolation. Booth was born in England; Guiteau was of French descent, while Czolgosz is virtually a native of Poland.