Welcome to MAIWelcome to MAI


"Hello, I'm William McKinley."
partial cover image from "American Boys' Life of William McKinley"                                              
About MAI
Disclaimer
Help MAI


Who I Am
Contact Me



 


Publication information
view printer-friendly version
Source: Buffalo Evening News
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “Czolgosz Case Now before the Grand Jury”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: Buffalo, New York
Date of publication: 16 September 1901
Volume number: 42
Issue number: 134
Pagination: 1

 
Citation
“Czolgosz Case Now before the Grand Jury.” Buffalo Evening News 16 Sept. 1901 v42n134: p. 1.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
Leon Czolgosz (grand jury).
 
Named persons
Louis L. Babcock; Leon Czolgosz; Albert Gallaher; Harvey R. Gaylord; Frederick Haller; Matthew D. Mann; Herman G. Matzinger; William McKinley; Herman Mynter; Thomas Penney; James L. Quackenbush.
 
Document

 

Czolgosz Case Now before the Grand Jury

 

Indictment for Murder, First Degree, Will Be Reported Soon.

Assassin Won’t Be Sworn.

     The County Court grand jury this morning began its consideration of the case against Leon Czolgosz, charged with murder in the first degree in killing President McKinley. District Attorney Penney is himself presenting the case.
     About 20 witnesses assembled in the District Attorney’s office this morning at 10 o’clock and after examining a few of them, Mr. Penney took Dr. Herman Mynter into the jury room. He was the first witness sworn.
     Dr. Mynter described the wounds to the jury and told of the operation which was performed at the Exposition hospital shortly after the President was shot.
     The jurymen were all present, according to the deputies who guard the entrance. They met and talked for some time before the introduction of testimony. From their windows they could see the black and white draperies with which the City Hall is strung. The wind flapped the black cloths to and fro just below the windows. All wore stern expressions when they entered the jury room, leaving but little doubt as to the indictment they will report.
     Czolgosz will not be taken before the grand jury. That announcement was made by Assistant District Attorney Haller to a photographer who was anxious to make a photograph of the prisoner.
     Many persons were attracted to the City Hall with the special object of getting a view of the culprit. They thought he surely would have to appear before the jury that will indict him and forgot entirely that many times people are indicted without even knowing that grand juries are considering charges against them.
     The list of witnesses called and to be called is a large one. Drs. Gaylord and Matzinger, who performed the autopsy in the presence of the assembled physicians, were among the first witnesses called. Dr. Gaylord was in the room from 10:35 until 10:50 o’clock. He described the wounds inflicted by the bullet and the method of making the examination, and Dr. Matzinger gave similar testimony, the latter being in the jury room about 15 minutes. Dr. Mann was in the room about 10 minutes, and was succeeded by Albert L. Gallaher of Chicago, a Secret Service man. Mr. Gallaher was one of the President’s body guard and gave testimony relating to the protection afforded the President.
     Attorney James Quackenbush and Louis H. Babcock were the next witnesses, the former coming from the jury room at 12:15 o’clock. Both of them were present when the President was shot and gave important testimony relating to the incidents of the tragedy. Mr. Babcock remained in the jury room about the same length of time that Mr. Quackenbush was there. Their testimony was particularly valuable in view of the fact that both are well known lawyers and Mr. Quackenbush has had much experience as an assistant district attorney. They knew just what facts were salient from a legal viewpoint.
     It was apparent after 12 o’clock that an indictment could not be reported before late in the afternoon. There are many witnesses still to be examined, and Mr. Haller said that an adjournment would be taken for luncheon. When this announcement was made some curious ones departed. The work of examining the witnesses is not lagging in spite of this fact, only the case is of importance and the utmost care must be exercised. There are legal reasons for this, too, one of them being that the President did not make an ante-mortem statement.

 

 


top of page