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Publication information
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Source: Daily Picayune
Source type: newspaper
Document type: article
Document title: “A Lapse from Life into the Sleep of Death”
Author(s): anonymous
City of publication: New Orleans, Louisiana
Date of publication: 14 September 1901
Volume number: 65
Issue number: 233
Part/Section: 1
Pagination: 10

 
Citation
“A Lapse from Life into the Sleep of Death.” Daily Picayune 14 Sept. 1901 v65n233: part 1, p. 10.
 
Transcription
full text
 
Keywords
William McKinley (medical condition); William McKinley (medical care); William McKinley (death); William McKinley (official bulletins).
 
Named persons
Frank Burkett Baird; Wilbur C. Brown; George B. Cortelyou; Edward G. Janeway; John D. Long; Matthew D. Mann; Charles McBurney; Ida McKinley; William McKinley; Herman Mynter; Roswell Park; Presley M. Rixey; Charles G. Stockton; Eugene Wasdin.
 
Document

 

A Lapse from Life into the Sleep of Death

 

As Told by the Bulletins from the Bedside During the Day and Night.

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 13.—The following bulletin was issued by the president’s physicians at 9 a. m.:
     The president [sic] condition has somewhat improved during the past few hours. There is a better response to stimulants. He is conscious and free from pain. Pulse, 128; temperature, 99.8

  P. M. RIXEY,
M. D. MANN,
ROSWELL PARK,
HERMAN MYNTER,
EUGENE WASDIN,
CHARLES G. STOCKTON,
GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

——

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 13.—Dr. Stockton came from the house at 11:50. He said:
     “The president is holding his own. That is all I can tell you.”

——

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 13, 12:30 P. M.—The president’s physicians report that his condition is practically unchanged since the 9 o’clock bulletin. He is sleeping quietly.

  GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

——

THE TERRIBLE TRUTH.

     Buffalo, Sept. 13.—The following bulletin was issued by the president’s physicians at 2:30 p. m.:
     The president has more than held his own since morning, and his condition justifies the expectation of further improvement. He is better than yesterday at this time. Pulse, 123; temperature, 99.4.

  P. M. RIXEY,
M. D. MANN,
HERMAN MYNTER,
EUGENE WASDIN,
CHARLES G. STOCKTON,
GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

——

A MOMENT OF HOPE.

     Milburn House, Sept. 13.—At 4:40 Secretary Cortelyou came across the street to the press tents and gave out the following bulletin:
     4 P. M.—The president’s physicians report that he is only slightly improved since the last bulletin. The pulse and temperature remain the same as at that hour.

  GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

     The secretary, in response to questions, merely said:
     “He is very, very weak.”

——

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 13, 5:30 P. M.—Colonel Brown just hastened to the telegraph office and dispatched a telegram. He said:
     “There has been a change for the worse. The president’s condition is very, very, very bad.”
     At 5:38 the physicians were hastily summoned.

——

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 13, 5:40 P. M.—The president is dying.

——

     5:43 P. M.—The physicians have announced the president is dying.

——

     5:48 P. M.—The president’s family has been summoned.

——

     5:55 P. M.—The president’s physicians report that his condition is grave at this hour. He is suffering from extreme prostration. Oxygen is being given. He responds to stimulants but poorly. Pulse, 125; respiration, 40.

  GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

——

     6:30 P. M.—The physicians report that his condition is most serious, in spite of vigorous stimulation. The depression continues and is profound. Unless it can be relieved the end is only a question of time.

  GEORGE B. CORTELYOU,
     Secretary to the President.

——

     7:03 P. M.—The president is unquestionably dying.

——

     7:23 P. M.—The president is unconscious. The end is but a short time away.

——

     The president became unconscious at 6:40, and now, at 7:40, is barely alive.

——

CALLED FOR MRS. MCKINLEY.

     7:58 P. M.—Under the effects of stimulants, the president revived at 7:50 and called for Mrs. McKinley. She is with him now.

——

     8:50 P. M.—Secretary Cortelyou and Mrs. McKinley have been with the president for some time. An announcement from the house stated that the president is in extremis.

——

     9:25 P. M.—A messenger announced that the president is being kept alive by great difficulty by the use of oxygen. It is added that the case is now more desperate.

——

     9:27 P. M.—The pulse has left the president’s extremities and he may live until midnight. Consciousness seems to have finally left him. In his most recent lucid moments the president comforted Mrs. McKinley.

——

LIFE SLOWLY EBBING AWAY.

     9:35 P. M.—Dr. Mynter, who has just left the house, says the president is slowly dying. The approach of death is already evident, as the body is getting cold. Dr. Mynter says, however, the president may last until 2 o’clock in the morning, although the end may come at any time.
     There is hardly any pulse to be felt.

——

     9:53 P. M.—The administration of oxygen has been suspended for some time. The president, before he finally lost consciousness, bade his wife a tender farewell. He was then heard to murmur words of the hymn, “Nearer, My God, to Thee,” probably his last words.

——

     10:40 P. M.—Dr. Mann said the president was still alive, and might linger for an hour longer.

——

     10:50 P. M.—The president is alone with his physicians and nurses. His extremities have long been cold and for over two hours he has been unconscious.

——

     11:07 P. M.—Dr. McBurney said it was possible that the president might live several hours. He is scarcely breathing, the circulation has ceased in his extremities, and they are cold.

——

     11:47 P. M.—Dr. Janeway, of New York, the heart disease specialist, was admitted to the Milburn house.

——

     Secretary of the Navy John D. Long arrived at 12:06 in time to see the president alive, though unconscious.

——

     12:30 A. M.—Frank Baird announced from Secretary Cortelyou that the president is still alive, and his condition practically as it had been for an hour.

——

     1:30 A. M.—The president’s pulse has shown practically no activity in four hours. There is only a slight heart beat. All of the doctors are still upstairs, near at hand to the patient.

——

     1:55 A. M.—The physicians, it is announced, are now remaining with the president out of respect, the time for their services having passed.
     Mrs. McKinley has retired to her room.

——

THE LAST BULLETIN.

     Milburn House, Buffalo, Sept. 14.—Secretary Cortelyou made the announcement that President McKinley was dead. He died at 2:15 a. m.
     The members of the family, with the exception of the bereaved wife, were at the death bed. Mrs. McKinley was in an adjoining room. Dr. Rixey was the only physician present.

 

 


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